TeriAnn's Guide to Aladdin and other brands of kerosene Mantle Lamps

Aladdin home pages  > Other brands home page  > Flame Spreaders 

 
 
 

 

Flame spreaders / Generators

Note: This web page is a joint effort between Bill Courter and myself. Bill provided some of the pictures and data used. Thanks Bill!

 

What does a flame spreader do?

Round wick lamps rely on hot air rising inside their chimney to pull fresh oxygen rich air into the burner to feed the flame. Their burners are designed to draw fresh air to the flame from both the inside and outside of the round wick. The flame spreader sits inside the round wick in the airflow path to redirect the air flow to the flame in order to oxygenate the fuel vapors coming off the wick. The design of the flame spreader determines how much air gets to the inside of the round wick and assures that the air is evenly distributed around the wick so that there is the correct air to fuel mixture for the fuel to burn hot and the wick to burn evenly. This means that for a flame spreader to work as designed it needs to be properly seated, free of excessive carbon build up and undamaged. Otherwise it will distribute air unevenly and cause the wick to burn unevenly. If the flame spreader is removed most of the air rising inside the round wick would go straight up the chimney and not provide oxygen to the flame.

 

Some history

The incandescent mantle and the kerosene mantle burner were invented in Germany during the late 1800's. The early burner designs used a flame spreader that was basically one or two brass discs attached to the top of a brass tube. The flame spreader's tube sat on a vertical pin located inside the inner wick tube. The disk at the top redirected the airflow towards the wick. This design was nicknamed a button generator or button flame spreader because the disc was the approximate size and shape of a common shirt button. Since a wick burned poorly without the flame spreader in place they were also called flame generators or just generators.

German industry saw a vast market in the United States and partnered with Americans to bring incandescent lamps to America. Burners, wicks, mantles and chimneys were imported from Germany and fitted to American made lamp fonts to be sold by American entrepreneurs. During the first decade of the 1900's there were at least a dozen US based incandescent lamp companies that sprang up to sell lamps with burners imported from Germany mounted on lamp bases manufactured in the United States. The Mantle Lamp Company (Aladdin) was one such company. Their first products were Practicus lamps which used an imported German burner mounted on a lamp base made by Plume & Atwood. The people at Aladdin and Plume & Atwood decided that they could design a better burner and the Aladdin model 1 was born using a variation of the standard German button flame spreader.

Meanwhile, Ehrich & Graetz (E&G) in Germany had developed a new kind of incandescent lamp flame spreader that was a cylinder with a flat top and rows of holes around the side near the top. Its design was a variation of the flame spreader in use by the round wick lamps but designed specifically to provide the correct airflow for their mantle lamps. Aladdin quickly saw the advantages in this design and initially came up with the model 2 flame spreader. They continued the development of their flame spreader through the years. Other companies that manufactured incandescent burners in the United States soon switched over to the flat top thimble shape flame spreader design as well. These were called thimble type flame spreaders in that they resembled the common sewing thimble

World war I changed the incandescent lamp industry in America. The trade with Germany was eliminated throughout WWI. American mantle lamp companies that used German burners and could not quickly come up with an American made burner went out of business. Also brass became harder to get and lamp companies that were poorly financed went out of business. It wasn't until the mid 1930's that German made incandescent lamps returned to the United States.

The American incandescent lamp industry standardized on seven eighths inch diameter thimble type flame spreaders around one inch tall. which is why Aladdin model 4 through 6 flame spreaders will fit almost all the other American company lamps made before the end of WWII.

Incandescent mantle lamps burn a lot hotter than non incandescent lamps and the thin wall thimble style brass flame spreaders get a lot hotter. The brass between holes would soon burn out with daily use. Starting with the model 5 flame spreader Aladdin switched from brass to a nickel steel alloy for its flame spreaders. This non-magnetic alloy does not rust and has a higher melting temperature than brass so it has a longer service life. Around this time the incandescent lamp industry also switched over to a nickel steel alloy for their flame spreaders.

The Aladdin flame spreaders from model 5 through model 11 used a brass cylinder inside the lower nickel steel cylinder as a baffle to reduce air flow through the lower 2 or 3 rows of air holes. The baffle was patented by Aladdin (1211163) so is unique to Aladdin flame spreaders (Filed 25 Feb 1913 by V. S. Johnson, granted 2 Jan 1917. Drawing of baffle from patent). The purpose of the patent was to minimize heat flow down from flame spreader to the inner wick tube.

When the manufacture of Aladdin burners was moved to Hong Kong the Aladdin flame spreaders were again made from brass.

 

Identifying an incandescent lamp flame spreader - some generalizations

If the flame spreader consists of a brass tube with one of more discs (button type) it was manufactured prior to 1920. Most of these belong to early German designed and manufactured burners. If the thimble type flame spreader has a seven eighths inch diameter it was made to fit an American manufactured burner. If the thimble type flame spreader is smaller than seven eighths inch diameter it is likely from an early German incandescent burner. If the thimble type flame spreader is larger then seven eighths inch diameter it is likely from a E&G designed burner manufactured after WWI by either E&G in Germany or Veritas in the UK. Luckily most of the Aladdin and some of the other company flame spreaders are embossed with the company and model name. This makes identifying those flame spreader a snap

 

If the thimble type flame spreader is large and has a flat round disk or cap at or near the top it is for around wick lamp that does not use a mantle.

Round wick lamp flame spreaders
Examples of common round wick lamp flame spreaders.
The one on the left is missing a flat sheet steel ring that sits near the top so might get mistaken as being a very large flame spreader for a mantle lamp.

 

.

 

Aladdin flame spreader interchangeability

You may have a lamp you want to use that is missing a flame spreader, has a damaged flame spreader or uses a rare flame spreader that you want to keep in top condition. Aladdin specified that their model 6 flame spreader could be used on model 4, 5 and 6 lamps and that the model 11 flame spreader could be used on model 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 lamps. Aladdin manufactured model 6 and 11 flame spreaders until the tooling was destroyed in a flood during 1955. Aladdin changed the name they called the flame spreader in 1928. Before 1928 they were called generators. When the model 12 lamp was introduced they started calling them flame spreaders. Model 6 and 11 flame spreaders labeled flame spreader were all manufactured between 1928 and 1955 as replacement flame spreaders to keep the older lamps in use. The Aladdin model 6 flame spreader can be thought of as a universal donor for other brands of American mantle lamp that used a thimble style flame spreader. It is the same diameter and approximate height so can be used in a pinch when an original flame spreader is missing, damaged or considered too rare to use.

The Aladdin flame spreader introduced with the model 12 lamp can be used on models 12, A, B, C Nashville and Brazil, 14 (Super Aladdin), 16A, 16B (In Australia), 21, 21C, 23 and 23A burners. If you encounter a brass flame spreader that seems just a little too wide to fit your burner it is likely one of the early Hong Kong flame spreaders. The very earliest model 23 burner manufactured in Hong Kong in 1974 through 1977 used parts that were slightly oversize including the flame spreader. You should always use the original flame spreader with this burner. This burner can be identified by the wick raiser knob. It is labeled "23 Aladdin" and does not have a representation of the Aladdin's lamp on the wick riser.

 

About the baffles on US Aladdin model 4 and through 11 flame spreaders
        From The Mystic Light, volume 28, No. 3 by Bill Courter, used with permission

* The purpose of the brass inner sleeve, called a baffle is to reduce the temperature of the inner wick tube. Heating of the inner wick tube (and the wick) is a major cause of increased fuel vaporization and "creeping up" of the flame (leading to black spot, sooting and run-away). The baffle sleeve is designed to provide insulation from the heat of the flame. The patent shows that this is accomplished by an air space created by a step or an offset to provide an air space between the inner wick tube and the baffle. The baffle covers the lower 2 or 3 rows of holes in the flame spreader to both move the flame to a more desirable higher position and help with cooling the upper part of the baffle. Some late model 6 flame spreaders labeled "Model 6 Flame spreader"manufactured as replacement flame spreaders do not have a baffle.

* This is a condensed version of the text. Please refer to the Vol 28, No 3 issue of The Mystic Light if you wish additional information.

From early on other companies using thimble flame spreaders have tackled the inner tube heating problem in different ways including dimples in the lower side of the flame spreader or corrugations along the lower side to minimize physical contact between the inner wick tube and the flame spreader, providing an air gap to help cool the inner wick tube.

 

Identifying an incandescent lamp flame spreader

 

Button style flame spreaders

 

Practicus table lamp flame spreader
Photo courtesy of Bill Courter

Practicus number 3 burner (circa 1908)
Manufactured by Eckel & Glinicke, Germany

Brass, 7.8" dia, 2-1/4" tall

Note: Used on the Practicus lamps sold by Aladdin and other lamp companies

Used on the Practicus lamps sold by Aladdin

 

Praktus parlor lamp flame spreader
Photo courtesy of Bill Courter

Praktus / Practicus number 2 burner (circa 1908)
Manufactured by Eckel & Glinicke, Germany

Brass top 3/4" dia, overall height 1"

Note: Used on the Practicus lamps sold by Aladdin and other lamp companies

Used on the Practicus lamps sold by Aladdin

 

Aladdinmodel 1 generator

Aladdin model 1 flame spreader (1909)
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood, USA

Brass, 7/8" diameter top disc, 3/4" overall height. 1/4" hollow brass tube 9/16" long from base of bottom disc and 1/4" dia.

Used on the Aladdin model 1 lamp

 

Wonder Lamp flame spreader

United Factories Wonder Lamp flame spreader, Fellboelin flame spreader
Manufactured by Fellboelin Petroleum Glohlicht Brenner (VERIFY COMPANY NAME)

Brass, top disk 7/8" dia, overall length 2-1/4". Two versions: Version illustrated has 10 holes in top disk and no holes in lower disk. Second version has ten holes in top disk and 10 holes in lower disk.

Note: There are multiple Felbollin burners that are very similar plus Felbollin burners made specifically for the American market sold to United Factories and marketed under the name Wonder Lamp. In the United States these burners were offered both as stand alone burners as upgrades to owners of flat wick lamps and they were paired with founts offered by either Plume & Atwood or Edward Miller & Co.

The early version of this lamp sold in the US used this flame spreader. Later versions of the Fellboelin burner used a thimble type flame spreader.

 

 

Bright As Day alternate flame spreader

Rider mantle lamp "Triple air CO2 generator"
Manufactured by Edward Miller Co.

Brass, cone shaped flame spreader mounted in stepped sleeve. Sleeve 7/8" dia at widest upper section. Positioned by widest section of sleeve resting against stop in inner wick tube. three arms at bottom keeps tube vertical in tube. Overall length 3-5/8".

Used on the Rider incandescent mantle lamp.

 

 

Unknown lamp flame spreader

Sunlight flame spreader
Manufactured by Edward Miller Co.

Brass with spring steel clips to locate the flame spreader in inner wick tube. There is a stop in the inner wick tube that anchors the bottom steel clip. Top disk is 3/4" dia. Overall length 3-1/4".

Note: The Sunlight mantle lamp was sold by Montgomery Ward in 1920 trough 1922. The lamp has no markings designating the brand or manufacturer.

 

Canchester Flame Spreader

Canchester Flame Spreader
Manufactured by The Canchester Lamp Company

Steel, shaft 1--1/4 inches long, disk 1/2" dia

Note: The burner patent was applied for in 1906 and the company went out of business in 1912 leaving a large supply of new in the box burners and chimneys.

Used on Canchester mantle lamps

 

 

San Diego flame spreader
Manufactured by Bradly and Hubbard
This is a hybrid two section flame spreader that has some aspects of a button flame spreader and some aspects of a thimble flame spreader

San Diego mantle lamp flame spreaderSan Diego flame spreader mounted
Fits inside top of inner wick tube with holes exposed

San Diego lamp gallery top
Top part of the flame spreader is permanently mounted to the gallery with three small brass arms

Brass, with a top and bottom section. Bottom section 7/8" dia, 5/8" tall. Top section has hollow tube at top that holds a ceramic rod with a forked top. The Ceramic rod is the mount for an unmounted mantle.

used on the San Diego mantle lamps

 


Saxonia flame spreader
Manufactured by Hoffmann, Germany

 

Saxona flame spreader

Brass, Overall length 1.06 in., shaft 0.87 in long

 

Photo and sketch courtesy of Anton Kaim

Saxona flame spreader measurements
Measurements in metric

Sketch copyright Anton Kaim not to be used without expressed permission

 

 

Thimble style Flame spreaders smaller than seven eighths inch diameter

Eugeos flame spreader

Eugeos flame spreader
Manufactured by Ehrich & Graetz, Germany

Brass, 11/16" dia, 1-1/8" high, Nine rows of holes. Stamped "Germany" on top

Note: Introduced in 1906 this was the first thimble flame spreader made by E&G

 

Kronos mantle lamp flame spreader

Kronos flame spreader
Manufactured by Hugo Schneider, Germany

Brass, 11/16" dia at top, 21/32" dia at base, 1-1/8" tall. Nine rows of small holes on upper side, single row of larger holes just below where the diameter narrows down. Three pairs of vertical dimples equally space along lower side. Single slot at base.

Note: This flame spreader was used on all the Kronos series burners. Kronos burners sold in the U.S. were sold on Edward Miller lamp fonts. Flame spreaders used on the Kronos 1911 burner had "M 1911" embossed on the top.

 

Candesco 1933 flame spreader

Candesco 1933 flame spreader
Manufactured by Ehrich & Graetz (Has one of their logos on burner)

Nickel steel, 11/16" dia, 1-1/16" tall, large row of holes at lower side of indentation plus 8 rows of smaller rows on upper side of flame spreader. Single slot at bottom rim.

Note: the burner is also known as the Candesco 80cp burner. This was the last of the Candesco series burners.

 

Fellboelin flame spreader

United Factories Wonder Lamp flame spreader, Fellboelin flame spreader
Manufactured by Fellboelin Petroleum Glohlicht Brenner (VERIFY COMPANY NAME)

Brass, 11/16" dia, 7/8" tall, 9 rows of holes

Note: These were used on the last versions of the Fellboelin burner. All the earlier versions of this burner used a button type flame spreader. When mounted on the lamp only the top 8 rows of holes are exposed.

 

Radia flame spreader
Photo courtesy of Bill Courter

Believed to be Radia flame spreader
manufactured by August Gamache, Quebec, Canada

Brass, 8 rows of holes

Used in Radia side draft burners

 

Aida flame spreader

Adia flame spreader
Manufactured by J. Hirschhorn, Germany

Brass, Diameter changes between row 4 and row 5 of the holes. 9/16ths dia at top, 11/16ths dia at base, 6 rows of holes. Single slot at base.

Note: The Adia burner was introduced around 1906 or 07 about 1 or 2 years before Plume & Atwood used the same design flame spreader for their Sunbeam and Beacon side draft burners. Then later for the Aladdin model 2. I wonder if the design simularities are a coincidence.

Used on the Adia side draft burners

 

 

Thimble style flame spreaders seven eighths inch diameter

 

Aladdin model 2 flame spreader

Aladdin model 2 flame spreader, Sunbeam model 1, Beacon model 1
manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Brass, 7/8" dia, 1-1/8" tall with 3 rows of holes on the side.

Used on the Aladdin model 2 lamp

 

Aladdin model 3 flame spreader

Aladdin model 3 flame spreader
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Brass, 7/8" dia, 1-5/6" tall

Note: The Kone kap mantle, along with the model 3 gallery and flame spreader went into production during model 2 production. Late model 2 lamps shipped with model 3 galleries and flame spreaders.

Used on model 3 lamps, and on late model 2 lamps

 

 

Aladdin model 12 and newer flame spreader
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood, Aladdin UK, Aladdin Brazil, and in Hong Kong

Approximately 1 inch tall, inverted cone top with flat center and hole in center of top.

Aladdin model 12 flame spreader

Aladdin model B flame spreader

Aladdin model C flame spreader

Left: Brass flame spreader was used in all vesions of the model 23 and MAXBRITE 500 burners made in China.
Right, Nickel steel flame spreaders came on the models 12, A, B, C Nashville and Brazil, 14 (Super Aladdin), 16A, 16B (In Australia), 21, 21C, and 23 England burners.

Note: Flame spreaders made from brass were made in China for Chinese manufactured model 23, 23A and MAXBRITE 500 burners. The nickel steel flame spreaders were used on all English 23 and earlier US model burners. This Aladdin flame spreader, introduced with the model 12 lamp, has undergone several minor changes over the decades. Some have slightly different heights. Others have different sizes for the side and and top holes. The diameter of the flat section at the center of the inverted cone top has changed size over time. The important thing is that they are almost all interchangeable. The exception is the very earliest model 23 burner manufactured in Hong Kong during 1974 through 1977. The burner parts were slightly oversize including the flame spreader. You should always use the original flame spreader with this burner. This burner can be identified by the wick raiser knob. It is labeled "23 Aladdin" and does not have a representation of the Aladdins lamp on the wick riser. Except for this burner any of these flame spreaders are interchangeable for models 12 and newer. Note that the two pictured flame spreaders have different size flat sections at the bottom of the inverted cone and a different size hole at the top center. The height is the same as are the holes on the side.

Aladdin Maxbrite flame spreader

The very late production model 23A and the MAXBRITE 500 flame spreaders only have a single notch on the underside of the flame spreader.  Earlier versions had the two notches.  The MAXBRITE flame spreader will fit Aladdin model 12 and newer burners except for the ery early model 23 burners made in China.

Nickel steel version used on the Aladdin model 12 , Aladdin Model A , Aladdin Model B, Aladdin Model C , Aladdin model C Brazil

 

Farmor flame spreader

Farmor flame spreader
Manufactured by The Farmor Manufacturing Co.

Nickel steel, 7/8" dia, 1" tall, 5 rows of holes on side plus one row of holes on the beveled top edge.

Used on Farmor mantle lamps

Farmor flame spreader
A very small number have been found with a number stamped in the top. The significance of the number is unknown.

 

SunFlame flame spreader

Sun Flame mantle lamp flame spreader
Manufactured by Farmor Manufacturing Co.

Brass, 7/8" dia, 1" tall, 5 rows of holes on side plus one row of holes on the beveled top edge.

Used on Sun Flame lamps

 

Solar flame spreader

Solar flame spreader, Ker-O-Lite flame spreader
Solar Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Nickel steel, 7/8" dia, 1" tall. Five rows of holes on side plus one row on the beveled top edge.

Note: The Solar table lamp is a close copy of the Aladdin model 6 lamp. The Coleman Ker-O-Lite was only offered during WWII.

Used on Ker-O-Lite lamps

 

Bright as Day flame spreader

Bright as Day Flame Spreader
Manufactured by Edward Miller & Co.

Brass, 7/8" dia, 1" tall, three rows of holes in side

Used on the Sears Bright as Day mantle lamp.

 

Sundart flame spreader

Photo courtesy of Bill Courter

Sundart and Lumo side draft burner Flame Spreader
Manufactured by Edward Miller & Co.

Brass, 3 rows of holes

Note: The side draft burners were sold by both Miller and Lumo as upgrades for lamps that came with a flat wick. All the Sundart lamps and Lumo lamps came with center draft burners. This burner was sold by Lumo and Miller's Sundart brand as stand alone burners only and not on lamps.

 

 

Beacon flame spreader

Beacon models 2 and 4, Lumineer, Sunbeam number 3 flame spreader and Radiant lamps
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Brass, 7/8" diameter, 1-1/8" tall, Seven rows of holes, inner sleeve restricts air flow at bottom 3 rows. Circle embossed on top.

Used on the Radiant mantle lamp sold by Montgomery Ward, Beacon, Lumineer and Sunbeam lamps

 

Late Sunbeam flame spreader

Late Sunbeam number 3 flame spreader
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Brass, 7/8" dia. 1-1/8" tall, 4 rows of holes, no baffle, circle embossed on top

Note: This is a rare version. Instead of a baffle covering the bottom holes, the bottom holes and the baffle have been eliminated.

Used on late stand alone Sunbeam burner, not on Sunbeam lamps.

 

 

Thimble style labeled flame spreaders seven eights inch diameter

Aladdin model 4 flame spreader

Aladdin model 4 flame spreader
manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Brass, 7/8" dia 1" tall

Note: All were labeled "4A". This was the first Aladdin flame spreader to make use of a brass baffle inside. This is a sleeve that covers the lower 3 rows of holes. This baffle is high enough that you can not see it by looking at the slots at the base of the flame spreader. After the model 4 flame spreader was discontinued, Aladdin recommended the model 6 flame spreader as a replacement.

Used on the model 4 lamps

 

Aladdin model 5 flame spreader

Aladdin model 5 flame spreader
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Nickel steel, 7/8" dia. Brass baffle inside covers the bottom 3 rows of holes

Note: This was Aladdin's first nickel steel flame spreader. It does not rust, is non-magnetic and can withstand higher temperatures than brass. When the model 5 flame spreader was discontinued Aladdin recommended the model 6 flame spreader as a replacement.

Used on the Aladdin model 5 lamps

 

Aladdin model 6 Flame spreaders
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Aladdinmodel 6 flame spreaders
The Aladdin model 6 flame spreaders were in production from 1914 through 1955. In 1928 Aladdin stopped calling their flame spreaders "generators" and started referring to them as "flame spreaders". Bottom left is the earliest version, followed by the top right. The underlined version was introduced when the model 9 lamp was introduced to help people differentiate between model 6 and model 9 flame spreaders. The top left flame spreader was introduced in 1928.

Aladdin model 6 generator

Nickel steel, 7/8" dia. 5 rows of holes on the side plus one row of holes on the diagonal top.

Note: The model 6 flame spreaders were factory recommended for use on the models 4, 5 and 6 lamps.

Used on the Aladdin model 6 lamps

 

Aladdin model 7 flame spreader

Aladdin model 7 flame spreader
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Nickel steel with inner brass baffle, 7/8" dia, 1" tall without brass baffle, 1-1/2" tall with brass baffle. Baffle reduces air flow through bottom two rows on the side of the flame spreader and is held in place by three punched dimples.

Note: Aladdin model 11 flame spreaders were the factory recommended replacement flame spreader after the model 7 flame spreader was discontinued.

Used on Aladdin model 7 lamps

 

Aladdin model 8 flame spreader

Aladdin model 8 flame spreader
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Nickel steel with inner brass sleeve, 7/8" dia, 1" tall without brass baffle, 1-1/2" tall with brass baffle. Baffle reduces air flow through bottom two rows on the side of the flame spreader and is held in place by three punched dimples.

Note: Aladdin model 11 flame spreaders were the factory recommended replacement flame spreader after the model 8 flame spreader was discontinued.

Used on Aladdin model 8 lamps

 

Aladdin model 9 flame spreader

Aladdin model 9 flame spreader
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Nickel steel with inner brass baffle, 7/8" dia, 1" tall without brass baffle, 1-1/2" tall with brass baffle. Baffle reduces air flow through bottom two rows on the side of the flame spreader and is held in place by three punched dimples.

Note: Aladdin model 11 flame spreaders were the factory recommended replacement flame spreader after the model 9 flame spreader was discontinued.

Used on Aladdin model 9 lamps

 

Aladdin model 10 flame spreader

Aladdin model 10 flame spreader
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Nickel steel with inner brass baffle, 7/8" dia, 1" tall without brass baffle, 1-1/2" tall with brass baffle. Baffle reduces air flow through bottom two rows on the side of the flame spreader and is held in place by three punched dimples.

Note: Aladdin model 11 flame spreaders were the factory recommended replacement flame spreader after the model 10 flame spreader was discontinued.

Used on Aladdin model 10 lamps

 

Aladdin model 11 flamespreaders

Aladdin model 11 flame spreaders
UK flame spreader on left, US flame spreader on right

Aladdin model 11 flame spreaders
US versions manufactured by Plume & Atwood
UK version manufactured by Aladdin Industries Ltd, Greenford

Nickel steel with inner brass baffle, 7/8" dia, 1" tall without brass baffle, 1-1/2" tall with brass baffle. Baffle reduces air flow through bottom two rows on the side of the flame spreader and is held in place by three punched dimples.

UK version has flat top and ring of holes on the top. There are seven rows of holes on side.
US versions have five rows of holes on side plus one row on the beveled top edge.

Note: The model 11 flame spreaders were factory recommended for use on the models 7, 8, 9, and 10 lamps. The name "generator" was changed to "flame spreader" in 1928.

Used on Aladdin model 11 lamps

 

Daylite flame spreader

Daylite flame spreader
Manufactured by E. Miller Co.

Nickel Steel, 7/8" dia, 1-1/8" tall. 4 rows of holes on side, top two rows larger diameter than bottom 2 rows. Plus one row of holes on beveled top edge.

Used on Daylite mantle lamp

 

lumeneer flame spreader
"The Mantle Lamp Co of America
Lumineer Model A
Chicago U.S.A."

Lumineer flame Spreader
Manufactured by Plume & Atwood

Brass, 7/8" dia, 3/4" tall. Four rows of holes in side..

Used on Lumineer burner. These burners were sold as mantle burner replacements for lamps that used flat wick burners.

 

 

 

Thimble style flame spreaders larger then seven eighths inch diameter

Montgumery Wards 1937 flame spreader

Montgomery Ward mantle lamp flame spreader (1936 - 1939)
Manufactured by Ehrich & Graetz

Nickel steel, 15/16" dia, 1-1/4" tall, Seven rows of holes.

Note: a few of these lamps have been found with the Famos 120 flame spreader and a carbon build up that suggests that they have been used for some time on these lamps. Since the Burner on this Wards lamp is essentially the same as the burner on the Famos 120 it is possible that E&G shipped some lamps to the US with the Famos flame spreader.

Used on 1930's Montgomery Ward mantle lamp

 

Montgumery Ward flame spreader 1941

Montgomery Ward #14-RA-86-7368 Flame spreader
Manufactured by Bradly & Hubbard

Brass, 1-2/4" dia, 1-5/8" tall. 14 rows of holes. Diameter widens very slightly just below bottom row of holes. This is the stop for locating the flame spreader in the inner wick tube.

Note: When Germany went to war with the UK the mantle lamps Ward was importing from Germany were no longer available. Ward went to Bradly & Hubbard and asked them to develop a mantle lamp for them. B&H made one based upon the Rayo round wick lamp. This lamp was sold in the 1940-1941 catalogs until the US entered the war and brass became a restricted metal.

Used on 1941 Montgomery Ward mantle lamp

 

Famos 120 flame spreader
Photo courtesy of Bill Courter

Famos flame spreader
Manufactured by Ehrich & Graetz, Germany or Veritas, England

Nickel steel, 31/32" dia, 1-1/16" tall. 7 rows of holes on side.

Famos 120 - Illustrated, flat top with no holes, rounded indentation along bottom rows of holes, single slot at base.

Wonderlite and Superspeed burners have at least 3 versions of flame spreaders all with the same basic dimensions and seven rows of holes along the side. May have 2 slots along bottom.

A: looks like the Famos 120 illustrated with the addition of a shallow flat circular depressed area on the top center that contains a hole in the middle.

B: Looks like A only with beveled top edge. The 7 rows of holes are located below the bevel.

C: Looks like A except top is slightly rounded and the sides are straight.

 

 

If you would like to discuss any of the contents please feel free to

© 2002, 2015 by TeriAnn Wakeman. All rights reserved.
This web site is not affiliated with Aladdin Mantle Lamp Company. Aladdin, and Lox-on are registered trademarks of Aladdin Industries LLC